POWER PLAYERS: Meet the 18 executives and scientists at Google Health who are shaping the future of the tech giant’s healthcare business

Google is going after the healthcare industry with renewed intensity.

Starting when Dr. David Feinberg joined the company in 2019, the tech giant is consolidating many of its health efforts onto a single team.

Called “Google Health,” it’s got more than 500 managers, scientists, clinicians, engineers, and product experts right now – and plans to only get bigger.

Read more: 11 tech chiefs, analysts, and bankers in healthcare reveal how Amazon, Microsoft, and Google have used the coronavirus to make new inroads in the $3.6 trillion industry.

A past iteration of the team, which tried to offer online personal health records, never took off. The company shut it down nearly 10 years ago, citing a lack of widespread adoption.

But the new group is an ambitious, self-described “product area” within Google that’s hoping to transform the way everyday people get care, and how the system delivers it.

Inside Google, Google Health oversees artificial intelligence projects and work with Verily, YouTube, and search teams. It’s also known to be a kind of medical voice and advisor to higher ups like CEO Sundar Pichai.

Read more: As Verily looks to IPO, CEO Andrew Conrad says an inter-Alphabet ‘sibling rivalry’ with Google’s own health team is hurting both companies.

Externally, the team has ongoing projects with public health officials, academic medical centers, and health systems like Ascension.

Business Insider identified 18 of the top leaders steering this still-developing part of Google’s strategy into the future. 

From members of former President Barack Obama’s administration to scientists on the cutting edge of machine learning, it’s a star-studded lineup given the difficult task of executing Google’s overall health mission: “improving the lives of as many people as possible.”

Here’s a rare look at the power players at Google Health, according to Google and other sources, listed alphabetically: 

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