Developers: 9 free downloads that will enhance your programming career

Code reviews, developer burnout, website design blunders, reactive mobile apps, and books about programming languages are some of the topics covered in these free TechRepublic downloads.

For software and web developers, there’s always something new–skills, programs, apps, and more–to learn. Software engineering is a lucrative and in-demand technical career. But if you let yourself slide on the technology, you’ll be left behind by the new kids coming along, honing their software skills. 

Whether you’re a front-end developer, back-end developer, project manager, web developer, junior developer, or senior developer, you’ll need to keep your skills sharp. We’ve compiled a list of free PDF TechRepublic downloads that highlight tools, skills, and best practices to help you improve your knowledge and take your software development career to the next level. 

Code reviews for software developers are meant to be a systematic examination of computer source code, intended to root out mistakes made in the initial development process and improve the quality of the software being created; however, several common mistakes arise that make the peer review process less effective. To learn more about the common mistakes software developer teams make with code reviews, and how to fix them, download this free PDF.

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Mobile software developers are among the top 10 most in-demand and hardest-to-fill tech jobs, according to data from Indeed. Companies across industries are increasingly seeking these professionals to build out apps, and with that work comes rolling out new features to keep them up-to-date and meeting internal and external customer needs. Here are five tips for successfully launching new app features, and some of the tools that will help you accomplish your goals.

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As mobile apps continue to evolve, the capability for them to operate in a reactive fashion becomes critical for ensuring engaging mobile user experiences. Certain best practices in Android and iOS development will help ensure that your mobile apps are nimble and responsive to user needs. This ebook offers 10 pointers for creating reactive apps that meet the challenges of the modern mobile environment. 

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If you’re old enough to remember the horrendous content displayed on Geocities websites back in the 1990s, you can call yourself a seasoned internet veteran. Websites and web development have come a long way since then, and for the most part they’re more polished and professional, especially business-related sites; however, there are pet peeves among users that plague some sites and drive away customers (or potential ones). With that in mind, here are 15 tongue-in-cheek tips on how to run a terrible website. Check out this list to be sure you’re not guilty of any of these design blunders as a web developer: Requiring certain browsers, using a cumbersome URL, annoying the user, forcing a login, and more. 

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Burnout is a common phenomenon in the tech industry, particularly for software developers and software engineers: Close to 60% of software developers report suffering from burnout in their jobs, according to Blind, for reasons including poor leadership and unclear direction, work overload, and toxic work cultures. “It’s obvious that job-related stress affects almost every industry, but we’re seeing higher numbers of burnout coming from the information technology industry, where a simple misconfiguration can cause millions of dollars in damage,” said Eric Shanks, solutions principal at AHEAD.

This ebook offers 10 strategies to help managers keep their developers from getting burned out and killing their software developer career.

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There are plenty of careers where books are essential, and to the casual observer software developer wouldn’t seem to be one of them. Programmers who stand out from their peers know better–they learn new and better skill sets throughout their careers. You can easily find solutions to all your coding roadblocks in software development with a Google search, but the solution to a syntax error won’t teach you about your craft–here are 15 books to help you do just that. These books won’t teach you to code (that’s what the internet is for), but they will teach you to be a programmer.

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JavaScript has been the world’s most popular programming language for years, but what are software developers doing with it, and which tools are they using? A recent analysis has shed light on the technologies software developers are using to help them build web and native apps with JavaScript. The analysis is based on data from the annual Stack Overflow survey, one of the most comprehensive snapshots of how programmers work, with the 2019 poll being taken by almost 90,000 software developers across the globe.

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If you are a software developer and you want to learn an in-demand programming language, Java has been a safe bet for your software developer career for many years. As an enterprise mainstay and web fixture, Java is likely to remain popular among employers for a long time to come. Java is still widely used for Android development; it’s also still ranked as the most popular programming language for software developers by the TIOBE index and as one of the programming languages most sought after by employers. Here are the 10 highest-ranked, English-language repositories on GitHub designed to help those learning Java and boost their development careers and by increasing development skills.

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You might think that machine learning is reserved for software developers and data scientists well-versed in languages like R and Python, but you’d be wrong–it’s great for software developers, too. Online code repository GitHub has pulled together the 10 most popular programming languages used for machine learning hosted on its service, and while Python tops the list, there are a few surprises in there.

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